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Sweet potato vs Potato - Health impact and Nutrition Comparison

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Article author photo Victoria Mazmanyan by Victoria Mazmanyan | Last updated on December 18, 2020
Education: General Medicine at YSMU
Sweet potato
vs
Potato

Summary

Sweet potatoes and potatoes are root vegetables that are only very distantly related to each other.

Sweet potatoes are higher in calories and carbs, while potatoes contain more protein and fats. Both are rich in various vitamins and minerals. Sweet potato is higher in vitamin A, vitamin E, vitamins B2 and B5, calcium, and copper.

Potatoes are richer in vitamin C, vitamins B3 and B6, iron, phosphorus, and potassium, while also being lower in sodium.

When it comes to the health effects, research is overall inconclusive. Sweet potatoes have a lower glycemic index. White and purple sweet potatoes may have a positive effect on diabetes and cancer.

Introduction

It is easy to assume that sweet potatoes and potatoes are different types of the same vegetable. However, despite the similarity of the names and looks, these vegetables are not even closely related.

In this article, we will talk about what similarities sweet potato and potato share and what sets them apart, with the main focus on health and nutrition.

Classification

Sweet potatoes and potatoes are tuberous roots of underground plants called root vegetables.

Botanically, plants of sweet potatoes and potatoes share the same order called Solanales. From that point on, these vegetables start to diverge.

The flowering plant of sweet potato belongs to the Convolvulaceae family, the Ipomoea genus, and the batatas species. The Convolvulaceae family is also often called morning glory, which is mostly used as the term for the ornamental flowers of this family.

The common potato plants, on the other hand, are a part of the Solanaceae family, the Solanum genus, and the tuberosum species. The Solanaceae family of flowering plants is commonly referred to as the nightshades, also including tomatoes, eggplants, chili, and bell peppers.

Sweet potatoes are often called “yams”; however, true yams are a separate and distinct species of vegetables.

Appearance

Sweet potatoes are commonly perceived to have brown skin and orange or red flesh; however, they can also be white-skinned and white, gold, purple-fleshed.

Common potatoes can also appear in white, yellow, red, purple, and other cultivars.

Taste and Use

Sweet potato and white potato taste quite similar. As the name suggests, sweet potatoes are naturally sweeter. However, different varieties of sweet potato have different levels of sweetness. Varieties with pale yellow or white flesh are less sweet and moist than those with red, pink, or orange flesh (1).

These two vegetables are also often used in the same ways: boiled, baked, roasted, grilled, fried, and so on.

Varieties

There are hundreds of varieties of both sweet potatoes and potatoes. Different varieties and types of these vegetables have different appearances, tastes, and nutritional values.

The most common varieties of sweet potatoes are Beauregard, Jewel, Garnet, Covington, White, and Japanese.

Most potato varieties fit into seven types: russet, red, white, yellow, blue or purple, fingerling, and petite (2).

Nutrition

Sweet potatoes are often considered to be healthier and more nutritious than white potatoes.

In this section, we will look into the specific difference between their nutrients and see how that statement holds up.

Macronutrients and Calories

Sweet potatoes and white potatoes have similar densities. Potato contains a little more water with a percentage of 79, while sweet potatoes contain 77% water.

One average serving size of a potato is half a cup of potatoes, diced, weighing around 75g. One average serving size of sweet potatoes is double that amount, equalling one cup of sweet potatoes in cubes that weigh 133g.

Calories

Sweet potatoes are a little higher in calories with 86 per 100g, whereas potatoes contain 77 calories in the same amount.

Protein and Fats

White potatoes are richer in both protein and fats.

Both sweet potatoes and potatoes contain some level of all essential amino acids. Sweet potato is a little richer in those essential amino acids, like tryptophan and threonine.

The predominant fats found in potatoes are polyunsaturated fatty acids and are considered to be healthier. Over half of the fat found in sweet potatoes is saturated.

Carbohydrates

Sweet potatoes contain 3g more carbohydrates than potatoes per 100g. Sweet potato contains more sugars than fiber, whereas the opposite can be said for potatoes. However, 100g of sweet potatoes still contains more fiber than the same amount of potatoes.

White potatoes contain more starch than sweet potatoes. In fact, starch makes up for the 95 percent of carbohydrates found in white potatoes. Both vegetables also contain low amounts of sucrose, glucose, and fructose.

Vitamins

Sweet potato and white potato have quite different vitamin compositions.

Sweet potato is an excellent source of vitamin A, containing much more of it than potatoes do. One hundred grams of sweet potatoes provide 284% of the daily value of vitamin A needed. Sweet potatoes are also richer in vitamin E, vitamin B2, and vitamin B5.

On the other hand, white potato is higher in vitamin C, vitamin B3, vitamin B6, vitamin B9, and vitamin K.

The two vegetables contain a similar amount of vitamin B1.

Both sweet potato and white potato are entirely absent in vitamin D and vitamin B12.

Vitamin Comparison

Vitamin comparison score is based on the number of vitamins by which one or the other food is richer. The "coverage" chart below show how much of the daily needs can be covered by 300 grams of the food
:
6
Potato
Contains more Vitamin A +709250%
Contains more Vitamin E +2500%
Contains more Vitamin B2 +90.6%
Contains more Vitamin B5 +171.2%
Contains more Vitamin C +720.8%
Contains more Vitamin B3 +90.5%
Contains more Vitamin B6 +42.6%
Contains more Folate +36.4%
Contains more Vitamin K +11.1%
Equal in Vitamin B1 - 0.081
Vitamin A Vitamin E Vitamin D Vitamin C Vitamin B1 Vitamin B2 Vitamin B3 Vitamin B5 Vitamin B6 Folate Vitamin B12 Vitamin K 852% 6% 0% 8% 20% 15% 11% 48% 49% 9% 0% 5%
Vitamin A Vitamin E Vitamin D Vitamin C Vitamin B1 Vitamin B2 Vitamin B3 Vitamin B5 Vitamin B6 Folate Vitamin B12 Vitamin K 1% 1% 0% 66% 21% 8% 20% 18% 69% 12% 0% 5%
Contains more Vitamin A +709250%
Contains more Vitamin E +2500%
Contains more Vitamin B2 +90.6%
Contains more Vitamin B5 +171.2%
Contains more Vitamin C +720.8%
Contains more Vitamin B3 +90.5%
Contains more Vitamin B6 +42.6%
Contains more Folate +36.4%
Contains more Vitamin K +11.1%
Equal in Vitamin B1 - 0.081

Minerals

Sweet potatoes contain higher levels of calcium and copper, as well as magnesium, manganese, and selenium.

Potatoes, on the other hand, are richer in iron, potassium, and phosphorus. They are also much lower in sodium.

Sweet potatoes and white potatoes contain similar amounts of zinc and choline.

Mineral Comparison

Mineral comparison score is based on the number of minerals by which one or the other food is richer. The "coverage" chart below show how much of the daily needs can be covered by 300 grams of the food
Contains more Calcium +150%
Contains more Copper +37.3%
Contains more Iron +32.8%
Contains more Phosphorus +21.3%
Contains more Potassium +26.1%
Contains less Sodium -89.1%
Equal in Magnesium - 23
Equal in Zinc - 0.3
Calcium Iron Magnesium Phosphorus Potassium Sodium Zinc Copper 9% 23% 18% 21% 30% 8% 9% 51%
Calcium Iron Magnesium Phosphorus Potassium Sodium Zinc Copper 4% 31% 17% 25% 38% 1% 9% 37%
Contains more Calcium +150%
Contains more Copper +37.3%
Contains more Iron +32.8%
Contains more Phosphorus +21.3%
Contains more Potassium +26.1%
Contains less Sodium -89.1%
Equal in Magnesium - 23
Equal in Zinc - 0.3

Glycemic Index

Sweet potatoes have a lower glycemic index compared to potatoes. The glycemic index of potatoes and sweet potatoes can range from moderate to high levels.

Based on the mean of nine studies, the glycemic index of cooked sweet potato is 70±6. However, based on cooking methods and the variety of sweet potatoes, the GI can range from 44 to 94.

Baked potatoes can have a glycemic index ranging from 60 to 98. The average GI of four types of baked potatoes is 86±6 (3).

Another study puts the glycemic index of boiled sweet potatoes at 63±6 and the GI of boiled potatoes at 78±4 (4).

Acidity

The pH value for sweet potatoes falls between 5.3 to 5.6, making it slightly acidic (5).

The acidity of potatoes is similar, also slightly acidic, with a pH value ranging from 5.4 to 5.9 (5).

Another value that shows the acidity of foods is the potential renal acid load. The PRAL shows the capacity of the food to produce bases or acids in the body.

The PRAL of sweet potatoes has been calculated to be -5.6, alkaline-forming, with the PRAL value for potatoes being -6.6, more alkaline-producing.

Weight Loss

Sweet potatoes and white potatoes both contain moderate levels of calories per serving. This can change depending on the cooking methods of these vegetables. For example, a hundred grams of boiled potatoes contain 87 calories, whereas the same amount of French fries contains 312 calories. Leaving the skin on makes these vegetables more nutritious, providing more fiber.

Meal replacements with white sweet potato may aid individual weight loss (6).

Some studies have found a correlation between the intake of French fries, baked or mashed potatoes, and weight gain: an added 1.5 and 0.6 kg (3.4 and 1.3 pounds) respectively, for every four years (7).

However, another research suggests that there is no need to exclude potatoes from weight management diets (8).

Overall, these vegetables aren’t ideal for low-carb or low-calorie diets; however, they can be included in all diets when prepared with the correct methods and in moderation.

The Sweet Potato and Potato Diets

Both of these diets are restrictive and promise weight loss if you eat nothing but sweet potatoes or potatoes for multiple days. There are variations to these diets, but all require you to eat cooked, not fried or highly processed, sweet potatoes or potatoes for every meal of the day.

Since these are low-calorie diets, they are likely to lead to weight loss. However, there are a few problems with these diets. As nutritious as these vegetables are, they do not provide all the essential nutrients the organism needs. There is also a likelihood of easily regaining the rapidly lost weight.

Health Impact

We learned that sweet potatoes and potatoes are both very nutritious, but what exact effects do they have on the human organism?

Health Benefits

Cardiovascular Health

Potatoes, being much lower in sodium than sweet potatoes, may be a better choice for people with high blood pressure. However, one study has found an association of a higher intake of baked, boiled, mashed, or fried potatoes with an increased risk of hypertension (9). This effect may be explained by weight gain and potatoes’ high glycemic load. Overall, higher consumption of potatoes has been shown to be adversely correlated with cardiovascular risk factors (10).

In contrast, some studies suggest that potatoes may have a positive effect on high blood pressure (11).

There is not enough research to conclude about sweet potato’s effect on cardiovascular health. However, one research found a purple sweet potato beverage to have an inclination to lower systolic blood pressure (12).

Diabetes

There is some evidence of an association between high glycemic index foods, such as some types of potatoes and sweet potatoes, and diabetes.

Studies about potatoes and diabetes are also inconclusive․ Some studies suggest that potato consumption leads to an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes (12). However, more research on humans is needed in order to have a final result.

A study has suggested that supplementation of white sweet potato may improve nutritional status and glycemic control in elderly diabetic patients (13). However, there is insufficient evidence about the use of sweet potato for type 2 diabetes mellitus as well (14).

Cancer

There are strong suggestions that purple sweet potatoes can be used as a preventive factor for colorectal cancer due to their high anthocyanin levels (15). Anthocyanins are flavonoids that give vegetables, such as purple sweet potatoes, their dark color.

Studies about the association of potatoes and cancer have been inconclusive and, at times, contradictory. Some research shows no link between potato consumption and pancreatic cancer, while others associate it with an increased risk. Some studies found potato intake to have correlations with a higher risk of rectal, colon, and colorectal cancers (16).

At the same time, there has been a study showing an inverse association between potato consumption and rectal cancer. More research is needed on this topic.

Downsides and Risks

Toxicity

Vegetables in the nightshade family that potatoes belong to produce a toxic compound called solanine, a glycoalkaloid. Naturally, potatoes produce such low amounts of this compound that it does not affect human health. However, under certain unfavorable conditions, such as pests, potato plants can increase the production of solanine, especially when kept in sunlight. Solanine gives potatoes a bitter taste and a green color.

Solanine poisoning symptoms may include diarrhea, vomiting, fever, and abdominal pains (18).

As sweet potatoes do not belong to the same family, they do not produce this compound.

References

  1. https://archive.org/details/sweetpotato00thot/
  2. https://www.potatogoodness.com/potato-types/
  3. https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article/114/5/1625/6320814
  4. Glycemic index for 60+ foods
  5. https://www.clemson.edu/extension/food/food2market/documents/ph_of_common_foods.pdf
  6. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6356856/
  7. https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/2014/01/24/the-problem-with-potatoes/
  8. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/25302575/
  9. https://www.bmj.com/content/bmj/353/bmj.i2351.full.pdf
  10. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32190135/
  11. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/329790914
  12. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4965517/
  13. https://nutritionandmetabolism.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12986-019-0398-8
  14. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6486146/
  15. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5624454/
  16. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6101424/
  17. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/12195164/
  18. https://www.canr.msu.edu/news/solanine_poisoning_how_does_it_happen
Article author photo Victoria Mazmanyan
Education: General Medicine at YSMU
Last updated: December 18, 2020

Infographic

Sweet potato vs Potato infographic
Infographic link

Comparison summary table

Pay attention to the most right column. It shows the amounts side by side, making it easier to realize the amount of difference.
Sweet potato Potato
Lower in Saturated Fat ok
Lower in glycemic index ok
Lower in Sugar ok
Lower in Sodium ok
Lower in Cholesterol Equal
Lower in price Equal
Rich in minerals Equal
Rich in vitamins Equal

All nutrients comparison - raw data values

Nutrient Sweet potato Potato Opinion
Net carbs 17.12g 15.39g Sweet potato
Protein 1.57g 2.05g Potato
Fats 0.05g 0.09g Potato
Carbs 20.12g 17.49g Sweet potato
Calories 86kcal 77kcal Sweet potato
Starch 12.65g 15.29g Potato
Fructose 0.7g 0.26g Sweet potato
Sugar 4.18g 0.82g Potato
Fiber 3g 2.1g Sweet potato
Calcium 30mg 12mg Sweet potato
Iron 0.61mg 0.81mg Potato
Magnesium 25mg 23mg Sweet potato
Phosphorus 47mg 57mg Potato
Potassium 337mg 425mg Potato
Sodium 55mg 6mg Potato
Zinc 0.3mg 0.3mg
Copper 0.151mg 0.11mg Sweet potato
Vitamin A 14187IU 2IU Sweet potato
Vitamin E 0.26mg 0.01mg Sweet potato
Vitamin D 0IU 0IU
Vitamin D 0µg 0µg
Vitamin C 2.4mg 19.7mg Potato
Vitamin B1 0.078mg 0.081mg Potato
Vitamin B2 0.061mg 0.032mg Sweet potato
Vitamin B3 0.557mg 1.061mg Potato
Vitamin B5 0.8mg 0.295mg Sweet potato
Vitamin B6 0.209mg 0.298mg Potato
Folate 11µg 15µg Potato
Vitamin B12 0µg 0µg
Vitamin K 1.8µg 2µg Potato
Tryptophan 0.031mg 0.021mg Sweet potato
Threonine 0.083mg 0.067mg Sweet potato
Isoleucine 0.055mg 0.066mg Potato
Leucine 0.092mg 0.098mg Potato
Lysine 0.066mg 0.107mg Potato
Methionine 0.029mg 0.032mg Potato
Phenylalanine 0.089mg 0.081mg Sweet potato
Valine 0.086mg 0.103mg Potato
Histidine 0.031mg 0.035mg Potato
Cholesterol 0mg 0mg
Trans Fat 0g 0g
Saturated Fat 0.018g 0.025g Sweet potato
Monounsaturated Fat 0.001g 0.002g Potato
Polyunsaturated fat 0.014g 0.042g Potato

Which food is preferable for your diet?

ok
ok
is better in case of low diet
Sweet potato Potato
Low Fats diet ok
Low Carbs diet ok
Low Calories diet ok
Low glycemic index diet ok

People also compare

Vitamin and Mineral Summary Scores

The summary score is calculated by summing up the daily values contained in 300 grams of the product. Obviously the more the food fulfills human daily needs, the more the summary score is.
Vitamin Summary Score
85
Sweet potato
18
Potato
Mineral Summary Score
21
Sweet potato
20
Potato

Macronutrients Comparison

Macronutrient comparison charts compare the amount of protein, total fats, and total carbohydrates in 300 grams of the food. The displayed values show how much of the daily needs can be covered by 300 grams of food.
Protein
9%
Sweet potato
12%
Potato
Carbohydrates
20%
Sweet potato
17%
Potato
Fats
0%
Sweet potato
0%
Potato

Comparison summary

Which food is lower in Saturated Fat?
Sweet potato
Sweet potato is lower in Saturated Fat (difference - 0.007g)
Which food is lower in glycemic index?
Sweet potato
Sweet potato is lower in glycemic index (difference - 16)
Which food is lower in Sugar?
Potato
Potato is lower in Sugar (difference - 3.36g)
Which food contains less Sodium?
Potato
Potato contains less Sodium (difference - 49mg)
Which food contains less Cholesterol?
?
The foods are relatively equal in Cholesterol (0 mg)
Which food is cheaper?
?
The foods are relatively equal in price ($0.2)
Which food is richer in minerals?
?
It cannot be stated which food is richer in vitamins. See the charts below for detailed information. See the charts below for detailed information. See the charts below for detailed information.
Which food is richer in vitamins?
?
It cannot be stated which food is richer in vitamins. See the charts below for detailed information. See the charts below for detailed information. See the charts below for detailed information.

References

The source of all the nutrient values on the page (excluding the main article the sources for which are presented separately if present) is the USDA's FoodCentral. The exact links to the foods presented on this page can be found below.

  1. Sweet potato - https://fdc.nal.usda.gov/fdc-app.html#/food-details/168482/nutrients
  2. Potato - https://fdc.nal.usda.gov/fdc-app.html#/food-details/170026/nutrients

All the Daily Values are presented for males aged 31-50, for 2000 calorie diets.

Data provided by FoodStruct.com should be considered and used as information only. Please consult your physician before beginning any diet.