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Oatmeal vs Rice - Health impact and Nutrition Comparison

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Article author photo Jack  Yacoubian by Jack Yacoubian | Last updated on August 18, 2021
Education: Haigazian Medical University
Oatmeal
vs
Rice

Summary

Rice is higher in calories, carbs, richer in vitamins B5 and folate. However, rice is more versatile in gastronomy and a cheaper grain. On the other hand, oatmeal is richer in most minerals and vitamins, and overall, is a healthier alternative than rice with more benefits.

Introduction

Rice is a grain that comes in many sizes, shapes, and colors. We will discuss long, white, regular, and enriched rice in this article. It is important to remember that it is not recommended to drain the rice and discard the boiling water when using enriched rice. Many of the enriched elements are removed by the discharged water.

About 9,000 years ago, China first harvested rice. Rice is now the third most harvested agricultural product, after sugarcane and corn. The world highly depends on rice when it comes to gastronomy. It is now used in various culinary cultures worldwide, including Asian cuisine, Arabic cuisine, Eurasian cuisine, Mexican cuisine, etc.

In addition to cooking, rice is also used to make different types of alcoholic beverages, such as saki.

Oats is another grain cereal. Its origin is different from that of rice. Oats were originally harvested in the fertile crescent found in the Middle East today. The difference in regional cultivation is that oats require fertile, well-irrigated soil to grow.

Oatmeal that takes a few minutes to prepare. This article will cover cooked, and processed forms of oats called oatmeal. Oat is the raw food with the longest cooking time, while oatmeal is a cut and pressed form of oat. Like rice, oats are fermented into alcoholic beverages.

Varieties and culinary world

Rice is one of the most commonly used cereal grains in the culinary world. The commonest rice preparations are pilaf and the side dish rice pilaf associated with different meal types. Rice can also be used in soup making, dessert making like rice pudding. Rice cakes are also prepared for diets and weight loss food plans.

In the culinary world, there are many distinct varieties of oat preparations. Oat is a cereal grain produced, and it is used to make meals such as overnight oats, oatmeal, rolled oats, masala oats, and porridge oats.

Overnight oats are breakfast oats that have digestive and gastronomic benefits from soaking overnight. Soaking oats makes them simpler to digest and allows them to absorb more flavors.

Oatmeal is prepared by crushing oats, which makes it easier to prepare and decreases the cooking or preparation time to 10 minutes instead of overnight soaking or hours of heating for regular oats.

It is important to mention that rice should never be consumed raw as it might be covered with dirt, bacteria, and other unwanted elements. However, oatmeal can be consumed raw, but it is usually unpleasant and hard to eat in that way.

Price

Rice is cheaper than oatmeal. Rice is available in different varieties worldwide as it is considered one of the most essential grains to have in every household.

Shelf life

Rice and oatmeal, if stored properly, can have a long shelf life that can extend over years. However, it is important to store both of them properly away from humidity and sunlight.

In this article, we will discuss the difference between rice and oatmeal based on their nutritional content, diet and weight loss, and health impacts.

Nutritional data comparison

Glycemic index

Oatmeal has a higher glycemic index than rice. Rice is categorized as a medium glycemic index food and has a glycemic index equal to 60. On the other hand, oatmeal has a higher glycemic index with a glycemic index equal to 79.

Calories

Rice is higher in calories compared to oatmeal. Rice has double the calories than oatmeal.

Carbs

Rice is higher in carbs compared to oatmeal. Rice has 2.3 times more carbs than oatmeal. The amount of carbs in rice is high.

Fiber

Although the amount of carb is higher in rice, the amount of fiber is lower in price than oatmeal. Oatmeal is richer in fibers.

Fats

The amount of fat is negligible in both foods; however, oatmeal contains a slightly higher fat than rice. It is important to note that this amount is mostly distributed in polyunsaturated fats.

Proteins

The amount of protein in rice and oatmeal is nearly similar; however, it is not relevant. They both contain around 2.5g per 100g of each.

Minerals

Oatmeal has a richer and more versatile mineral profile compared to rice. Oatmeal is richer in iron, copper, magnesium, and zinc. 300g of oatmeal can satisfy the recommended daily value of iron by more than 100%.

Below is the diagram of mineral contents.

Mineral Comparison

Mineral comparison score is based on the number of minerals by which one or the other food is richer. The "coverage" chart below show how much of the daily needs can be covered by 300 grams of the food
:
2
Rice
Contains more Calcium +700%
Contains more Iron +396.7%
Contains more Magnesium +116.7%
Contains more Phosphorus +79.1%
Contains more Potassium +74.3%
Contains more Zinc +26.5%
Contains less Sodium -98%
Equal in Copper - 0.069
Calcium Iron Magnesium Phosphorus Potassium Sodium Zinc Copper 24% 224% 19% 33% 6% 7% 17% 22%
Calcium Iron Magnesium Phosphorus Potassium Sodium Zinc Copper 3% 45% 9% 19% 4% 1% 14% 24%
Contains more Calcium +700%
Contains more Iron +396.7%
Contains more Magnesium +116.7%
Contains more Phosphorus +79.1%
Contains more Potassium +74.3%
Contains more Zinc +26.5%
Contains less Sodium -98%
Equal in Copper - 0.069

Vitamins

Like the mineral profile, oatmeal has a richer and more versatile vitamin profile than rice. Oatmeal is richer in vitamins B1, B2, B3, B6, and vitamin A. On the other hand, rice is richer in vitamin B5 and folate.

Below is the diagram of vitamin contents.

Vitamin Comparison

Vitamin comparison score is based on the number of vitamins by which one or the other food is richer. The "coverage" chart below show how much of the daily needs can be covered by 300 grams of the food
:
2
Rice
Contains more Vitamin A +∞%
Contains more Vitamin E +75%
Contains more Vitamin B1 +59.5%
Contains more Vitamin B2 +1553.8%
Contains more Vitamin B3 +104.9%
Contains more Vitamin B6 +211.8%
Contains more Vitamin K +∞%
Contains more Vitamin B5 +23%
Contains more Folate +31.8%
Vitamin A Vitamin E Vitamin D Vitamin C Vitamin B1 Vitamin B2 Vitamin B3 Vitamin B5 Vitamin B6 Folate Vitamin B12 Vitamin K 26% 2% 0% 0% 65% 50% 57% 20% 67% 33% 0% 1%
Vitamin A Vitamin E Vitamin D Vitamin C Vitamin B1 Vitamin B2 Vitamin B3 Vitamin B5 Vitamin B6 Folate Vitamin B12 Vitamin K 0% 1% 0% 0% 41% 3% 28% 24% 22% 44% 0% 0%
Contains more Vitamin A +∞%
Contains more Vitamin E +75%
Contains more Vitamin B1 +59.5%
Contains more Vitamin B2 +1553.8%
Contains more Vitamin B3 +104.9%
Contains more Vitamin B6 +211.8%
Contains more Vitamin K +∞%
Contains more Vitamin B5 +23%
Contains more Folate +31.8%

Diet and weight loss

If associated with a healthy diet, Rice can promote weight loss if it has insufficient calories or promotes a healthy and balanced diet. With a meal, rice makes the person feel fuller faster, thus reducing the number of calories consumed. Rice is widely consumed in Asian cuisine. It is linked to a healthy diet and can promote good health when consumed in moderation.

Oatmeal is also associated with a healthy and well-balanced diet. It is usually associated with an energy-boosting and balanced breakfast. Oatmeal with milk, which can be vegan or dairy, in addition to different types of fruits, is a great way to start your day.

Vegan

Vegans have no restrictions when it comes to rice and oatmeal.

Vegans can use rice milk as a substitute for dairy milk. Rice milk is sweeter than other non-dairy milk and is often supplemented with vitamins and minerals.

Additionally, as an alternative to dairy milk, oats milk is available on the market.

Keto

Rice and oatmeal are high in carbs and are not allowed to be consumed in the keto diet. Other low-carb seeds and cereals can be used as an alternative to rice and oats.

Bodybuilding

The difference here comes in the absorption of carbs from oatmeal and rice.

Rice carbs are readily more absorbable from the digestive tract than oatmeal. Oatmeal is richer in complex carbs, although rice is higher in total carbs. Rice is suitable to give a quick boost in carbs pre or post-workouts. However, oatmeal provides a longer and slower carb release into the system. Both are suitable for bodybuilding; however, when to eat is the important application of each.

Baby food

Most baby formulas are rice-based, and rice is easier to digest and consume for babies, mostly due to its softness.

Rice diet

The rice diet is a calorie-restricted diet that claims to promote weight loss. The daily calorie intake is initially set at 800. (which is also called the detox period).

After that, the calorie count is increased to 1000 each day until the ideal weight is reached. This diet permits grains, fruits, and vegetables to be consumed.

On the other hand, experts argue that this diet isn't as healthy as it claims because it prioritizes a high carbohydrate intake with a medium glycemic index. Furthermore, protein, fat, and other vitamins are not consumed, which could lead to malnutrition if sustained over time (weeks). As a result, the rice diet isn't recommended for long-term use.

It's crucial to note that the minimum calorie consumption for a healthy diet is 1600.

This diet is not recommended for long-term weight loss for persons involved in their regular life, such as work or exercise. It is useful in hypertension individuals since it is a low-fat, low-sodium diet. However, medications to treat hypertension are now accessible. Classifying this as a fad diet.

Celiac disease

Rice and oat are gluten-free and can be consumed in celiac disease catered diets and gluten intolerance diets. They are good alternatives for wheat and barley.

Lactose intolerance

People who suffer from lactose intolerance can consume rice and oat milk which are alternatives to dairy milk.

Health impacts

Cardiovascular health

It's worth noting that moderate white rice-eating has no link to the development of cardiovascular disease. (1)

Consumption of oats is linked to lower serum cholesterol and blood sugar levels, which lowers the risk of developing hypertension and cardiovascular disease. (2)

Diabetes

According to this study, there is a link between white rice intake and the development of type 2 diabetes. (3)

Blood glucose and cholesterol levels were shown to be lower in people with uncontrolled type 2 diabetes. Hypercholesterolemia and hyperglycemia management are associated with oat consumption. (4)

Consuming whole-grain cereals like oats lowers the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. It also helps to maintain blood glucose and lipid levels in check. When compared to other cereal grains, oat-based diets have lower fatty acid absorption. (5)

Cancer

The intake of rice has no link to the development of cancer. (6)

On lung cancer cells, beta-glucans found in oats show anti-carcinogenic capabilities. (7)

Digestive system

Oatmeal consumption is associated with a reduced risk of diverticulitis. Furthermore, it lowers cholesterol absorption, which has a beneficial influence on overall metabolism. (8)

The consumption of oats has been linked to better development of intestinal microbiota. (9)

Arsenic poisoning

Numerous amounts of foods contain trace amounts of arsenic, and these amounts are not a concern. However, mass-produced rice that contains higher amounts of arsenic than normally is found. These are mostly due to polluted water and soil near industrial sources. Arsenic concentration has several negative effects, such as cardiovascular problems, metabolic disorders and diabetes, neurological disorders, and congenital disabilities in pregnancy. (10)

References

  1. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/25527760/
  2. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/7840076/
  3. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/22422873/
  4. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/26690472/
  5. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32641435/
  6. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/15184005/
  7. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/28756506/
  8. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/15471177/
  9. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31638148/
  10. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5502079/
Article author photo Jack  Yacoubian
Education: Haigazian Medical University
Last updated: August 18, 2021

Infographic

Oatmeal vs Rice infographic
Infographic link

Comparison summary table

Pay attention to the most right column. It shows the amounts side by side, making it easier to realize the amount of difference.
Oatmeal Rice
Lower in Sugar ok
Lower in Sodium ok
Lower in Saturated Fat ok
Lower in glycemic index ok
Lower in price ok
Rich in minerals ok
Rich in vitamins ok
Lower in Cholesterol Equal

All nutrients comparison - raw data values

Nutrient Oatmeal Rice Opinion
Net carbs 9.97g 27.77g Rice
Protein 2.37g 2.69g Rice
Fats 1.36g 0.28g Oatmeal
Carbs 11.67g 28.17g Rice
Calories 68kcal 130kcal Rice
Starch 10.37g g Oatmeal
Fructose 0g g Oatmeal
Sugar 0.46g 0.05g Rice
Fiber 1.7g 0.4g Oatmeal
Calcium 80mg 10mg Oatmeal
Iron 5.96mg 1.2mg Oatmeal
Magnesium 26mg 12mg Oatmeal
Phosphorus 77mg 43mg Oatmeal
Potassium 61mg 35mg Oatmeal
Sodium 49mg 1mg Rice
Zinc 0.62mg 0.49mg Oatmeal
Copper 0.066mg 0.069mg Rice
Vitamin A 433IU 0IU Oatmeal
Vitamin E 0.07mg 0.04mg Oatmeal
Vitamin D 0IU 0IU
Vitamin D 0µg 0µg
Vitamin C 0mg 0mg
Vitamin B1 0.26mg 0.163mg Oatmeal
Vitamin B2 0.215mg 0.013mg Oatmeal
Vitamin B3 3.025mg 1.476mg Oatmeal
Vitamin B5 0.317mg 0.39mg Rice
Vitamin B6 0.29mg 0.093mg Oatmeal
Folate 44µg 58µg Rice
Vitamin B12 0µg 0µg
Vitamin K 0.4µg 0µg Oatmeal
Tryptophan 0.04mg 0.031mg Oatmeal
Threonine 0.083mg 0.096mg Rice
Isoleucine 0.105mg 0.116mg Rice
Leucine 0.2mg 0.222mg Rice
Lysine 0.135mg 0.097mg Oatmeal
Methionine 0.04mg 0.063mg Rice
Phenylalanine 0.13mg 0.144mg Rice
Valine 0.151mg 0.164mg Rice
Histidine 0.057mg 0.063mg Rice
Cholesterol 0mg 0mg
Trans Fat 0.003g g Rice
Saturated Fat 0.226g 0.077g Rice
Monounsaturated Fat 0.391g 0.088g Oatmeal
Polyunsaturated fat 0.426g 0.076g Oatmeal

Which food is preferable for your diet?

ok
ok
is better in case of low diet
Oatmeal Rice
Low Fats diet ok
Low Carbs diet ok
Low Calories diet ok
Low glycemic index diet ok

People also compare

Vitamin and Mineral Summary Scores

The summary score is calculated by summing up the daily values contained in 300 grams of the product. Obviously the more the food fulfills human daily needs, the more the summary score is.
Vitamin Summary Score
27
Oatmeal
13
Rice
Mineral Summary Score
44
Oatmeal
14
Rice

Macronutrients Comparison

Macronutrient comparison charts compare the amount of protein, total fats, and total carbohydrates in 300 grams of the food. The displayed values show how much of the daily needs can be covered by 300 grams of food.
Protein
14%
Oatmeal
16%
Rice
Carbohydrates
12%
Oatmeal
28%
Rice
Fats
6%
Oatmeal
1%
Rice

Comparison summary

Which food is lower in Sugar?
Rice
Rice is lower in Sugar (difference - 0.41g)
Which food contains less Sodium?
Rice
Rice contains less Sodium (difference - 48mg)
Which food is lower in Saturated Fat?
Rice
Rice is lower in Saturated Fat (difference - 0.149g)
Which food is lower in glycemic index?
Rice
Rice is lower in glycemic index (difference - 19)
Which food is cheaper?
Oatmeal
Oatmeal is cheaper (difference - $1)
Which food is richer in minerals?
Oatmeal
Oatmeal is relatively richer in minerals
Which food is richer in vitamins?
Oatmeal
Oatmeal is relatively richer in vitamins
Which food contains less Cholesterol?
?
The foods are relatively equal in Cholesterol (0 mg)

References

The source of all the nutrient values on the page (excluding the main article the sources for which are presented separately if present) is the USDA's FoodCentral. The exact links to the foods presented on this page can be found below.

  1. Oatmeal - https://fdc.nal.usda.gov/fdc-app.html#/food-details/171662/nutrients
  2. Rice - https://fdc.nal.usda.gov/fdc-app.html#/food-details/168878/nutrients

All the Daily Values are presented for males aged 31-50, for 2000 calorie diets.

Data provided by FoodStruct.com should be considered and used as information only. Please consult your physician before beginning any diet.